Pharaohs of Egypt

Pharaohs of Egypt

Most Famous Pharaohs of Egypt

The world still wonder about how sophisticated the Ancient Egyptian empire? The empire has risen strong and powerful when it was very far back in time. Regardless of the very primitive available tool and the harsh environment, it survived and succeeded. People still look back in time with so much pride and astonishment of the Ancient Egyptian Empire. Luckily the narratives of those pharaohs were documented for us, the future generations, on the temples’ walls as well as tombs. get to know about the most famous pharaohs of Egypt.

With much gratefulness to the Egyptologists who worked hard to translate and connect all those little pieces of information like puzzle, we now are a little closer to this unbelievable civilization that has once lived on the land of Egypt for 3000 years and under the ruling of 170 pharaohs.The role of the Egyptian pharaohs is believed to be covering the political and religious aspects of life. They set rules of punishment and praise; therefore, they kept their empire under control. The interpretation of the pharaohs’ ruling varies from one pharaoh to another; however, pharaohs were regarded to have some sort of divinity, and also they were believed to be the connection point between people and Gods.

Besides the spiritual and religious position the pharaohs were recognized by, they were responsible about the regulation and the leadership aspects of life. Each one of them had a separate and distinguishable legacy and directions. For example, some pharaohs favored the military side; others innovated in the architecture while other group of pharaohs was known to be brilliant diplomats.

1. Djoser (reign 2686 BC – 2649 BC)

Djoser was the most renowned Egyptian pharaoh of the Third Dynasty; however, his life was relatively mysterious. The most piece of fact he is known for is that he was the direct leader of Saqqara pyramid construction which is the great step pyramid, a monumental landmark in ancient Egyptian architecture. He ordered to build this pyramid to protect his body and possessions after death, and he was the first to use the famous step pattern.

2. Khufu (reign 2589 ‒ 2566 BC)

Khufu, a Fourth Dynasty pharaoh, who left behind one of the greatest constructions of all time, the Great Pyramid of Giza, which is regarded to be one of the Seven Wonders of the World. The massive building is a tribute to Egyptian architecture’s baffling brilliance and, surprisingly, has remained the highest man-made structure in the world for the better part of 4,000 years. Khufu envisioned it as his staircase to heaven, and the method of building remains a debatable question till this moment. To the extent that some people believe that it was built by aliens.

3. Hatshepsut (reign 1478–1458 BC)

Hatshepsut is the second Egyptian ruler. Her story of ruling Egypt started with marrying Thutmose II. When her step-son Thutmose III was just two years, his father died in 1479 BC, thus Hatshepsut quickly ascended to the throne. Therefore she reigned during the Eighteenth Dynasty (Despite the fact that Thutmose III governed as co-regent). As a woman, she needed to do much more effort than her male counterparts for the people to believe in her worthiness of the ruling. So in order to step up much further in her legacy, she claimed that Amon-Ra has visited her mother in her dreams which was her proof of divinity.
She earned the position of pharaoh and proved to be a capable ruler, re-establishing and renovating vital trade routes and presiding over years and years of tranquility and fulfillment.

4. Thutmose III (reign 1458–1425 BC)

After the death of his father, Thutmose III dedicated all his time and effort to military training to get prepared for ruling Egypt during the regime of his step mother Hatshepsut. Hatshepsut died in 1458. The military training was proven to be paying off and the Egyptians loved and trusted Thutmose III to be the ruler for his reputation. He was believed to be a military genius, so he was called Napoleon of Egypt. Thutmose III never lost a war, and his military successes earned him the esteem of his followers, so he earned the title of the strongest pharaoh of all time.

5. Amenhotep III (reign 1388–1351 BC)

Amenhotep III ruled Egypt for 38 years, most of which were calm and wealthy. Few Ancient Egyptian pharaohs can compare to Amenhotep III’s legacy in architecture; in fact, his achievements as pharaoh were more social and political than military.

6. Akhenaten (reign 1351–1334 BC)

Akhenaten, the son of Amenhotep III, was given the name Amenhotep IV at birth but altered it to reflect his extreme monotheistic convictions. His new name, which meant “He who is of service to the Aten,” honored Aten, the Sun God, whom he considered to be the only real deity.
Because of his strong religious beliefs, Akhenaten relocated the Egyptian capital from Thebes to Amarna and gave it the name Akhetaten, which means “Horizon of Aten.” Before Akhenaten’s reign, Amarna had never been recognised as a distinct geographic entity. He gave the order to build a new capital city at the same time as he changed his name. He picked the location because it was deserted and Aten’s alone; no one else owned it.
Nefertiti, Akhenaten’s wife, was an important figure throughout his rule and contributed significantly to his religious uprising. Nefertiti gained notoriety for her limestone bust in addition to the fact that she was the wife of an Ancient Egyptian pharaoh. The Neues Museum houses one of the most replicated pieces of ancient Egyptian art.
Egypt swiftly reverted to polytheism and the ancient gods Akhenaten had denounced after his death.

7. Tutankhamun (reign 1332–1323 BC)

Tutankhamun, the most well-known Egyptian pharaoh of all, was the youngest pharaoh in Egyptian history when he seized the reign at barely 9 or 10 years old.
The young pharaoh’s renown comes almost completely from the uncovering of his grave in 1922, one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of the 20th century, rather than from any outstanding accomplishments. Only 10 years were spent in power, and the pharaoh, who came to be known as “King Tut” following the discovery of his magnificent burial place, passed away at the young age of 20. Egyptologists are still unsure of how he was killed.

8. Ramses II (reign 1279–1213 BC)

Ramses II’s governorship was unquestionably the best of the 19th Dynasty and was blatantly extravagant even by pharaonic standards. King Ramses II, the son of Seti I, who shared co-regency for a time, went on to declare himself a deity, build a reputation as a fierce warrior, have 96 sons and daughters, and ruled for 67 years.
Without a doubt, Ramses the Great was not an ordinary pharaoh. This is evidenced by both the substantial architectural legacy of his reign and the fact that his luxury items are said to have brought the monarchy dangerously near to insolvency at the time of his death and burial.

9. Cleopatra VII (reign 51 – 30 BC)

Cleopatra reigned over the latter days, which weren’t the best, of the Egyptian kingdom as the last Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt active monarch, but her popularity persisted in today’s mythology, Shakespeare’s plays, and Hollywood movies. Scholars contend that Cleopatra’s portrayal in the mythology as a stunningly attractive seductress undersells her genius as a leader, despite the fact that it is difficult to separate the actual Cleopatra from the fiction.

Cleopatra was a cunning, politically smart queen who was successful in restoring tranquilly and a good portion of wealth to a failing kingdom; although, Egypt at the time she took over the throne wasn’t at the best place in its history. Her relationship with Julius Caesar, Marc Anthony, and their tragic story is what she was most known for. This story was fictionalized and adopted in many different ways in poems and movies. However, at least we can state that the Egyptian kingdom came to an end when Cleopatra committed suicide on August 12, 30 BC.

King Ramesses III
King Ramesses III

King Ramesses III  Family of King Ramesses III His immediate predecessor, Setnakhte, a very

King seti I
King seti I

King Seti I Family The second pharaoh of Egypt's 19th Dynasty during the New Kingdom was Seti I

King Horemheb
King Horemheb

King Horemheb Family In 1321 BC, Horemheb proclaimed himself king, wed Nefertiti's sister, and

King Narmer
King Narmer

King Narmer King Mena is another name for King Narmer. He was Egypt's first king. Early Dynastic

King Snefru
King Snefru

King Snefru King Snefru, also known as Sneferu. He was the first pharaoh of the 4th dynasty of

King Zoser
King Zoser

King Zoser Family Seals discovered in Khasekhemwy's tomb and at Beit Khallaf connect Djoser

King Cheops
King Cheops

King Cheops King Cheops (2589-2566 BC) was the pharaoh who erected the Great Pyramid of Giza

King Chephren
King Chephren

King Chephren Khafre, also spelled Khafra, Greek Chephren, was the fourth pharaoh of ancient

King Ahmose
King Ahmose

King Ahmose   Ahmose I, was the 18th dynasty's founder and king of ancient Egypt. He

Yuya Mummy
Yuya Mummy

Yuya Mummy and Meaning Origin Yuya was from the village of Akhmim in Upper Egypt, where he

King Thutmose III
King Thutmose III

Thutmose III King Thutmose III Family He was the son of Thutmose II by a secondary wife, Iset

King Amenhotep III
King Amenhotep III

King Amenhotep III He served as Egypt's 9th pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty, Also he known as

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